Health Care Reform- the Path Forward

We are moving towards a new equilibrium in Health Care- it won’t be perfect, but it will, hopefully, be an improvement over our present system.

There will be many adjustments required- some painful- on our way to this new equilibrium as all parties try to protect “the devil they know”.

In short, we are moving away from a system  a) with many uninsured, b) where employers provide insurance for some, c) where providers make hundreds of billions annually while delivering questionable quality, and d) where states must balance health costs against other priorities, such as infrastructure and education.

We are, hopefully, moving towards a system a) with far fewer uninsured, b) where employers provide insurance for most if not all employees, c) where providers incomes are more aligned with results, and d) where the balancing act faced by the states becomes somewhat easier to manage.

Now for the bumps in the road- some examples:

  1. Some states are avoiding or preventing an expansion of Medicaid and reducing benefits and eligibility as they try to protect state budgets.

  2. Providers are consolidating to increase their market power and negotiating leverage.  This is a powerful force designed to increase costs (which are provider’s revenues).

  3. Employers, as they try to protect profit margins, are reducing the hours of employees under a threshold so they will not be required to provide insurance for them.

  4. Young, healthy males are not signing up, largely because their costs, alone among all demographic groups, are expected to skyrocket.

My hope is that we, as a country will stay the course and see this through.  Early indications are that the individual market will see dramatic price reductions (notably New York and California).

Some states are taking a second look at the role of Medicaid- keep your eye on Arizona.

Medicare is looking at the “gaming” of provider reimbursement, where hospitals acquire physician practices for the sole purpose of billing for the same procedures under a new number (the hospital’s billing number), and getting paid more without doing anything  differently.  This bears watching as well.

But we need to do more- we need to provide products with a range of benefit options aimed specifically at the employees whose hours have been cut.  It does little to offer a “bronze” plan which only transfers risk to the insured (by covering 60% of costs)- why not offer a product where the insured can decline some coverage types- why should a childless person be forced to buy pediatric coverage?

We also need to offer products aimed at healthy young males.  It will be tough to get someone to accept a near doubling  of rates simply because it is good for everyone else.

As health care reform rolls out and gains traction, my hope is that “profiteering” behaviors will be limited and that products will be allowed to emerge that will address, in a market driven manner, the present shortcomings in the system-  specifically, we need an expansion of Medicaid, we need to stop the provider consolidations done solely to increase reimbursement, and we need insurance products aimed at part-time employees and healthy young males- not products that lock in a major subsidy for other demographic groups.