It is time to break the provider “monopoly” in health care.

Many of us believe the health care discussion is actually about money, masquerading as “quality”.  We see a number of versions of this:

1) The wave of hospital mergers.  They are presented to the public as “improving quality”, but a recent article (AARP bulletin, June 2013) cites cost increases of up to 40% following a merger.

2) Network restrictions imposed by insurers.  Large health systems whose prices are rejected during contract negotiations generally claim that to eliminate them from a network will “compromise quality”.  Pressure is then put on the insurer to include the prestigious hospital system in the network at a typically higher cost.

We also see some promising developments:

1) A recent New York Times article (“Lessons in Maryland for costs at Hospitals”, August 28, 2013) describes some results of using hospital price controls and encouraging patients to receive care outside of the traditional hospital (lower costs, better quality statistics, more satisfied patients, and yes, more profitable institutions).

2)     An increase in the number of retail clinics, and an increase in the range of services they are able to provide.

There are some commonalities here:  when we, the patients, are no longer considered “captive” by the local providers, and instead have alternatives where we can go to receive our care, interesting things happen- costs tend to go down.  Quality tends to go up.

So what then, are the benefits of granting local monopolies to select groups of health care providers?  There is an interesting lesson now playing out in New York City:

A hospital in lower Manhattan, St. Vincent’s recently closed.  Prior to the closure, providers predicted a drop in “the quality of care provided to local residents”.  Politicians predicted a disaster.  And what happened?  Nothing!  Death rates have not soared, the community has not suffered- in fact, many urgent care centers opened up to fill the void.

Some may argue that access in the neighborhood has improved- minor conditions can now be seen efficiently and at low cost, as opposed to lengthy waits in an emergency room that is also serving those with contagious conditions.

I hope this trend not only continues, but accelerates.  A provider “monopoly” tends to benefit only the providers.  It is time for the consumer to be at the center of this system!

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